Demonstration Website

Churches and Church Groups

Jabez Creative will move your ministry forward by creating a complete digital presence for any size congregation. Jabez Creative will be a perfect addition to your team of serving volunteers and church staff regardless of their level of technical skills.

 

We offer a portfolio of church website templates and Facebook designs that will engage members while attracting new visitors on the web. Equally important, we will create and manage all leading social media platforms including YouTube, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. beautiful church website sample screens

 

Build your website the Jabez Creative way. With years of experience designing beautiful church websites and social media campaigns, fresh faces will start showing up at your church service and public events. Church members will start to become more engaged.

 

Multi-building or multi-location? Jabez Creative will establish the online digital presence for one worship center or multiple locations. With the popularity of Uber, we will make certain to have all locations, entrances, and parking clearly marked so guests can be picked up and dropped off at the right door. As your church's digital presence expands, public reviews and comments may be easily tracked, evaluated and managed.
 

Driving traffic to your website requires bright and engaging creative content to catch the viewers attention. That is one of the basics of successful church marketing. Marketing content should be prepared for first time guests and members while promoting outreach partners and missions.   All of these groups go to your website for information and Jabez Creative will create high-quality content for each of them.

 

Our video and graphic services include a reference library of images, content and successful campaigns.  Websites include a powerful content management system (CMS) that your webmaster has complete access to.  The Jabez Creative CMS includes ministry apps and is more powerful and user friendly than WordPress, Wix and other website platforms. Technical support is provided by online web meeting, e-mail, and telephone so we are always just a phone call away.

churches and church groups

church and church groups, multi-location churches

 

FAITH IN FLUX

Church Attendance
Are you curious about the how's and why's of attendance changes from one of the leading traditional faiths? Pew Research shares valuable insight into why traditional faiths sometimes have a downward trend in attendance: Findings show that although most church-goers gradually drifted away, the most common reason cited by those changing is having found another religion that is preferable (58%). For example, a majority of Protestants who changed denominational families within Protestantism (51%) also cite a lack of spiritual fulfillment as a reason for leaving their childhood faith.

Changing Within Protestantism

Understanding the how's and why's of youth and adult attendance changes in the church.

Are you curious about the how's and why's of attendance changes from one of the leading traditional faiths? Pew Research shares valuable insight into why traditional faiths sometimes have a downward trend in attendance: Findings show that although most church-goers gradually drifted away,  the most common reason cited by those changing is having found another religion that is preferable (58%). For example, a majority of Protestants who changed denominational families within Protestantism (51%) also cite a lack of spiritual fulfillment as a reason for leaving their childhood faith. 
Figure 4.1

Eight-in-ten adults who were raised Protestant are still Protestant, and about two-thirds of this group (or 52% of all those raised Protestant) are still members of the same family of denominations (e.g. Baptist, Methodist, Lutheran, etc.) in which they were raised. The other third (28% of all those raised Protestant) are now members of a new family of Protestant denominations. However, one-fifth of those raised Protestant have left Protestantism altogether; most of them are now unaffiliated (13%), with smaller numbers having become Catholic (3%) or members of other faiths (4%). This section of the report takes a closer look at the large group of people (15% of the overall population) who have changed faiths within Protestantism (e.g., those who were raised Presbyterian and are now Episcopalian, or those who were raised Methodist and are now Baptist).

Most people who have changed faiths within Protestantism say they left their childhood faith before turning age 24 (56%). And relatively few report having changed religion as older adults. Only 22% of those changing within Protestantism say they joined their current religion after age 35.

Figure 4.2

When it comes to church attendance and strength of faith from childhood to adulthood, those who have changed faiths within Protestantism tend to closely resemble Protestants who still belong to their childhood faith. Members of both groups report a decline in church attendance over their lifetime. Roughly three-quarters say they attended church at least once a week as a child. Among those who have changed faiths within Protestantism, this figure drops to 64% in the teenage years and to 53% in adulthood. Among Protestants who still belong to their childhood faith, 63% attended religious services regularly as teenagers and 50% do so as adults.

In contrast to this drop in reported levels of church attendance ... More than two-thirds (69%) say their faith is very strong as an adult, while roughly one-third (35%) say their faith was very strong as a child, similar to the proportion saying it was very strong as a teen (32%). Interestingly, a very similar proportion of Protestants who still belong to their childhood faith say their faith as an adult is very strong (65%), and the arc of their faith follows a very similar pattern.

When asked whether a series of specific reasons were among those motivating them to leave their childhood religion, the most common reason cited by those changing within Protestantism is having found another religion that is preferable (58%). A majority of Protestants who changed denominational families within Protestantism (51%) also cite a lack of spiritual fulfillment as a reason for leaving their childhood faith.

Four-in-ten of those who changed faith within Protestantism say they just gradually drifted away from their childhood religion, and a similar number say they left their childhood faith because they were not satisfied with the atmosphere at worship services. Many who change religion within Protestantism also cite life changes as at least partly responsible for their decision to leave their childhood faith; more than a third (37%) left their former faith because they moved to a new community and a similar number left because they married someone from a different religious background (33%). By comparison, relatively few who changed within Protestantism say they left their former religion because they stopped believing in its teachings (15%).

Figure 4.4The vast majority (85%) say they joined their current denominational family because they enjoy the services and style of worship. Roughly a third (36%) say they joined because they were attracted by a particular minister or pastor and a similar number (30%) say a member's invitation to join was an important factor in their decision. Half of those changing faiths within Protestantism (50%) say they felt called by God to join their new faith.

About three-in-ten (28%) of those who changed within Protestantism say they made the transition to their current faith because of marriage, and 38% say moving was an important reason for their religious switch. Divorce, separation and death of a loved one are rarely cited as reasons for joining a new faith among this group, with less than 10% naming each.

When asked to state in their own words the main reason for having switched religions:  more than one-in-five mentioning marriage or other family reasons as motivations behind their religious change. Fewer say they were motivated to switch religions because of their religious beliefs.

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